April 20, 2014

Humility, Prudence, and Earth Day

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Source: Acton Institute | John Couretas At a World Council of Churches conference last year on the French-Swiss border, much was made of the “likelihood of mass population displacement” driven by climate change and the mass migration of people fleeing zones inundated by rising seas. While the WCC acknowledged that “there are no solid estimates” about the likely numbers of what it called climate refugees, that didn’t stop assembled experts from throwing out some guesses: 20 million, hundreds of millions, or 1 billion people. The WCC bemoaned the fact that international bodies looking at the impending climate refugee crisis were not taking it seriously and, despite its own admission that the numbers of refugees were impossible to predict, called on these same international bodies to “put forward a credible alternative.” The WCC did a thought experiment on the problem: What kind of adaptation is relevant to migration? Sea walls? Cities … [Read more...]

British Bishops Urge ‘Carbon Fast’ for Lent

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Pity these poor guys, trying so hard to remain relevant -- and even then they are months behind. LONDON (AP) -- Several prominent Anglican British bishops are urging Christians to keep their carbon consumption in check this Lent. The 40-day period of penitence before Easter typically sees observant Catholics, Anglicans, and Orthodox Christians give up meat, alcohol or chocolates. But this year's initiative aims to convince those observing Lent to try a day without an iPod or mobile phone in a bid to reduce the use of electricity -- and thus trim the amount of carbon dioxide spewed into the atmosphere. Bishop of London Rev. Richard Chartres said that the poorest people in developing countries were the hardest hit by man-made climate change. He said Tuesday that the ''Carbon Fast'' was ''an opportunity to demonstrate the love of God in a practical way.'' … [Read more...]

Fundamentalism: It’s Not Just for Right Wing Christians Anymore

On the Acton Institute's PowerBlog, John Couretas has a good post (Got a feelin' of Eco-Justice?) response to "the cascading daily disclosures of Climategate . . . global warming alarmist operating within the progressive/liberal precincts of churches and their activist organizations" have taken to dismissing science and playing " the theology card!" … [Read more...]

Patriarch Bartholomew on World Environment Day

Message from His All Holiness (June 5, 2009). The patriarch's full text follows: Today’s World Environment Day is an opportunity as well as an invitation for all of us, irrespective of religious background, to consider the ecological crisis. In our time, more than ever before, there is an undeniable obligation for all to understand that environmental concern for our planet does not comprise a romantic notion of the few. The ecological crisis, and particularly the reality of climate change, constitutes the greatest threat for every form of life in our world. Moreover, there is an immediate correlation between protection of the environment and every expression of economic and social life. For our Orthodox Church, the protection of the environment as God’s creation is the supreme responsibility of human beings, quite apart from any material or other financial benefits that it may bring. The almighty God bequeathed this “very beautiful” world (Gen. 1.26) to humanity together … [Read more...]

Hope for the Future!(?)

The Manifesto is blessed

In Sweden, the Interfaith Climate Summit has issued forth with the The Uppsala Interfaith Climate Manifesto, a perfectly ordinary amalgam of religious sentiment and environmental alarmism typical of ecumenical groups. Which is to say that there's precious little political, economic or scientific insight in the broadside from Uppsala. Of course, there's no indication from the summit's participants that the causes and cures proposed for global warming may be controversial, especially in the scientific community. Yet, what sets the Hope for the Future! manifesto apart from total banality, and makes it interesting, is its unmistakably coercive tone about what both developed and developing countries "must" do about climate change. Apparently, the "global village" ethic of environmental activists does not apply when demands are made of the powers that be. The manifesto was signed by Fr. John Chryssavgis, representing the Ecumenical Patriarch, and Fr. Leonid Kishkovsky, director of … [Read more...]