October 31, 2014

How about a good Catholic story?

This post isn’t intended to cheer-lead the Catholic Church, but to show the kind of ministry we Orthodox could also be doing. We do some very good things (FOCUS, IOCC, etc.) but imagine what a clearer focusing of goals and resources could accomplish. Watch the interview and get inspired. Here the Catholics are a good example to us. (You will have to sit through a 20 second ad.)

Comments

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    Scott Pennington says:

    Beautiful story. We need to work on funding for Orthodox parochial schools in this country. The public system just indoctrinates children with progressive liberalism and fuzzy thinking at the expense of real education.

    Also, this highlights the need for the Church to reach out to latinos and blacks, each of whom constitute a substantial portion of the American public. The Church will really be able to say it’s doing it’s job in America when the Church reflects the ethnic composition of the culture. This, of course means evangelistic outreach. I propose we cancel the EA and use the money about to be wasted on it for something worthwhile. The bishops can do a conference call.

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    Michael Bauman says:

    How about the Church actually reaching our to Anglos first too?

    We have periodically visited the possibility of having an Orthodox school in our parish. With 10 people in the room, there are at least 15 opionions of what such an animal really is. The folks with money typically want to make sure their children will still have the same secular avenue to fame, fortune and sucess that they have in their current private schools. Many simply want public school with an Orthodox patina.

    So, what is an Orthodox school. What do we teach, how do we teach it, where is the money, administration and teachers going to come from.

    Just one for instance among many: Is science really going to be taught from an Orthdox understanding of humanity and the rest of creation or simply replicate the materialist naturalism of the scientistic establishment. Do we have a multi-pronged approach that teaches both the worldly approach and our own? (Believe me there are plenty of Orthodox communicants who would be profoundly uncomofortable with their children being taught anything other than the scientistic paradigm.)

    Would there be any continuity in approach and commitment or would the standards and approach change with each change in administrators and demographics of the student body?

    Personally, a homeschooling cooperative is a much better way to go IMO.

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    cynthia curran says:

    Well, I’m not against outreached to hispanics but the orthodox should be more careful than the Roman Catholics and the evangelicals have. Both the Roman Catholic and Evangelial leadership favor an immirgation policy which is closer to the President of Mexico Felip Calerion which is to legalized all the people from his country who came here illegality and Mexico has a double standard since it deports and jails central americans that come to Mexco illegality. Number two, different regions of the US have different ethnic groups in the southwest blacks are a small group less than 6 percent in most western states while asians are a much larger group in California, Washington and Hawaii, so how about trying to target without overdoing it asians in those states for the orthodox faith.

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    I would like to drop my two cents about the evangelization of Latin-Americans* in the US.

    First, I am not for illegal immigration. I would not like to see the Church becoming an accomplice in what is, after all, a crime. On the other hand, the Church cannot simply give its back to anyone. I’m not clergy, but I suppose that proper pastoral care would include an actual purification of the many entitlement lies they are told by liberals and an infusion of a deeper sense of of respect for the people, history, culture and laws of the country they are in. Hopefuly, in the end of this process they would either seek legal ways of staying in the country or return to theirs. I lived in in the UK for 2 years, legally. And I was absolutely shocked with the attitude of some immigrants who would offend and despise the country that had received them and given opportunities their own countries had denied them. Gratitude is a Christian virtue too.

    Said that, there is a fact that strikes me as of great importance. In the New World, American Orthodoxy is the best organized one, not to mention that the sheer number of material already translated into English is vastly superior to the material in Spanish and even more to the material in Portuguese. Reaching for these communities in the US is a way for Orthodoxy to touch these cultures with its own voice. These people have ties in their countries of origins, many will eventually return. Surely, the final responsibility is that of the local churches in each country. Yet, I’m sure that there could be a good reverberation of mutual exchange between immigrants and their original cultures if there were Orthodox Latin-American communities in the US.

    * I prefer the term “Latin-American” because not all Latin-American are Hispanics. In fact, “Latin-American” does not contemplate the countries where English and Dutsch are the first languages, although they are a minority.

Care to comment?

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